Obtaining a PhD at the UvA

Why do a PhD at the UvA?

You’re thinking of doing a PhD and are looking at various options. So what are the benefits of doing your doctoral programme at the UvA?

Excelling in research

If you choose to do a PhD at the UvA, you will be joining an organisation that recognises the key importance of excellent doctoral research. Research carried out by the UvA’s academic community ranks among the best of the world, and the University competes very successfully for external research funding, both in the Netherlands and beyond. The UvA's 20 research priority areas represent the very best the UvA has to offer in terms of research and are also areas in which the UvA is a worldwide leader.

Employment benefits 

Another important benefit of doing a PhD at the UvA is that most PhD vacancies are paid positions. This means that, while doing your doctoral research, the University employs you as a staff member. This means you benefit from the UvA's terms of employment.

Stimulating environment

When you do research at the UvA research you work in a stimulating and innovative environment where your talents can be optimally developed. The UvA has a critical, creative and international climate and welcoming atmosphere. Join a community of independent thinkers who love research and who have the courage to ask questions and disagree with one another.

European connections

Joining the UvA also means joining an international research community. As one of Europe’s major universities, the UvA is a member of various international consortia of universities and research institutes. It is also a member of the League of European Research Universities (LERU) and the global network Universitas21.

Facts and figures

  • Around 500 doctoral degrees (PhDs) are conferred annually at the UvA.
  • Two-thirds of PhD positions are in the sciences and medicine, and a third in social and behavioural sciences, humanities, economics and law.
  • In total, around 2,000 PhD candidates carry out doctoral research at the UvA.

Published by  University of Amsterdam

2 January 2018